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RECOVERY STRATEGIES OF THE FORMERLY DEPRESSED

News   •   Jan 16, 2015 12:27 +08

Abstract

Anyone can be stricken by mental illness. As a nation with a fast pace of living and high-stress environment, the nature and prevalence of mental illnesses in Singapore is comparable with other developed nations. As Singapore moves towards having an emotionally resilient and mentally healthy community, it is important that Singapore pays attention to the challenges faced by the mentally ill. Out of the mental illnesses that afflict Singaporeans, depression is the most common and affects approximately 170,000 of them. Increasingly though, the Institute of Mental Health, Singapore and the United States has moved towards a more enlightened view towards mental illnesses, that is, it is recoverable and can be treated. A central theme that recurs in the review of literature was that each individual has their own unique definition of recovery. Hence, there can be “no one size fits all” treatment plan. However, as a patient moves through the process of recovery, he/she has to build in coping strategies. There is a gap between the drive towards mental wellness and the understanding of practical coping strategies. Hence, this study examines 30 individuals who have recovered from depression and consolidates the most common recovery strategies. Simply put, this report lays out the best practices of what helps depressed individuals in the recovery process.

To read more, download the research paper at the Attached File.section below.

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Management Development Institute of Singapore (MDIS)

RECOVERY STRATEGIES OF THE FORMERLY DEPRESSED – A STUDY OF WHAT HELP

A research paper done by Khoo Yi Feng, Diploma in Psychology

DPSD2 1215A – School of Psychology

22 July 2013

Author’s Note

Correspondence concerning this project paper should be addressed to

MDIS School of Psychology, 501 Stirling Road, Singapore 148951

or e-mailed to: mdis@mdis.edu.sg

Attached Files

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